The state is already flooded with traffic as hopeful eclipse-watchers head to their viewing places before the weekend. All the hype and travel may be for nothing at all. The Total Solar Eclipse could actually be a complete hoax. 

If there's one thing we can agree on, it's that we're all talking about the total solar eclipse. Airlines are offering over $1,000 for people to give up their seats for those coming in to see the eclipse, rental car companies are out of cars, gas stations are running out of gas and the grocery stores are soon to have empty shelves. No, I'm not kidding.

All of this to watch an eclipse.

I get hype. I love hype. I'm the first person to get all wrapped up in a game, a championship, tailgating, awards shows, marches - all that sort of thing. I love it when people come together for one purpose. The energy is infectious. However, this eclipse is out of hand.

Then I see that there's no solid support on the NASA website saying the eclipse will happen. This isn't to say that it won't. But will it?

The theory is that the eclipse has been known about for years because of some complex mathematical calculation. However, when you look on the NASA website for said calculation, it's nowhere to be found. In addition to the lack of support on the NASA site, if you google any contradictory information having to do with the eclipse, it doesn't come up. Take a peek at this article and tell me what you think.

Wondering if we'll see an eclipse on Monday? Yeah, me too.