It happened in the afternoon, around 4:30. My wife was the first to be targeted. Honey, she asked? Did you just call me from my phone number? Confused, I shook my head and answered no. As I racked my bring trying to find meaning in what she meant my phone began to ring, "Justin Bieber's Baby ringtone in case you were wondering" when I looked down to see who it was, my number appeared.

Perplexed and confused I picked up, wondering who would be on the other end. Was it my future self? This could be the most crucial moment of my life. I slowly brought the I-phone up to my ear and muttered out a soft hello.
No answer. Hello, I asked again, the anticipation causing me to tremble, anxiety heard in my voice. By this time my wife had run into the room realizing I too may be a victim of the very same thing she had just experienced.
Just before I could gather enough resolve to say "hello future self", the line disconnected.  The sound of silence was raw, my emotions drained. What the hell just happened?
 After a quick google search, this is what I found from the FTC
"No, this isn’t an alternate reality where your future self is calling the present you. It’s a scammer making an illegal robocall.
Technology makes it easy for scammers to fake or “spoof” caller ID information. They can make it look like they’re calling from a different place or phone number. Even your number. Scammers use this trick as a way to get around call-blocking and hide from law enforcement. They hope you’ll be curious enough to pick up. Don’t fall for it.
The real callers could be calling from anywhere in the world. We’ve written about these kinds of tricks before — like when scammers pretended to be the IRS and faked caller ID, so people thought it really was the IRS calling.
Bottom line? These calls from your own number are illegal. Don’t pick up — or press buttons to be taken off the call list or to talk to a live person. That just leads to more calls. It’s best to ignore them and move on with your day. Maybe watch a really good sci-fi movie.