Let the hacking continue--now, it's taking over the Treasure Valley.

Over the past few weeks, there have been far greater stories surrounding "hacking"--most of which have far greater repercussions. Here in Boise--more particularly the North End, ALLEGEDLY, a hack had people chuckling.

A Snapchat sent to me by a friend that lives in the North End made me laugh--"Life's a B*tch" the sign read. During a week that has felt long, drawn out and stressful, I replied with an "Amen!".

What I didn't know was that this sign would be all over the internet, including on a local Boise reddit page. Wait a second--this sign was real!?

Judging by some of the local banter around this traffic sign, it appears that yes--the sign was real and it has people talking. We are also learning that this kind of "sign hacking" is more common than you may thing.  There are, according to folks online, manuals for these types of signs online with default passwords to access the settings. Apparently, if this is true, they don't get changed very often.

This local traffic sign in particular was spotted, according to locals, around 18th Street and Resseguie Avenue.

I wish that the sign would have been up for a little longer--I'd love to have a selfie with this thing. I'm sure that by now, the password has been changed to the lockbox--if that's even a real thing.

Did you capture any photos of the traffic sign? Can you verify that this really went down in our own North End this week!?

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