Life as we know it is changing day to day and we're having to figure out how to deal with new challenges. The first one that comes to mind is the lack of toilet paper. There are 150 companies that produce toilet paper in the US and its not like we import a bunch of it from China so why are people hoarding it? Worry not, they can keep it, no toilet paper, no problem get a bidet. Europe, the UK and Asia use them and now you can too. Here are instructions from wiki how.

1
Use the toilet first. The purpose of the bidet is to help clean off after toilet use. You can use the bidet in conjunction with toilet paper, or you can use the bidet on its own. Some people believe that using a bidet is a hygienic substitute for toilet paper, but many choose to use both.
2
Find the bidet. Sometimes, the bidet is located near the toilet, attached to the wall: it looks something like a low sink or a toilet with a faucet. However, many modern bidets are built into the toilet seat, so you don't need to get up to straddle another fixture.[3]

  • These are the three main types of bidet: the standalone bidets found in Europe, the handheld bidets found in some households, and the toilet seat bidets, embodied on the seat cover or fixed on back or side toilet rim, called add-on bidets, that are common in Asia.
    • Standalone bidet: These bidets are separate fixtures which usually sit right next to the toilet. Sometimes, however, you'll find them across the room, or down the hall. Either way, you will need to use the toilet, then stand up and move over to the bidet. This is the original model of the bidet that originated in 18th-century Europe.
    • Add-on side-toilet rim or seat bidets: Many bathrooms in Asia and America don't have the space to accommodate a separate fixture next to the toilet – so many toilets are designed with built-in bidets or fixtures that fit over the toilet side rim or the seat. This way, you don't need to get up to clean yourself.
    • Handheld bidet: A bidet that hangs on the wall, and must be manually moved to the desired position to use.

3

Straddle a standalone bidet. On most standalone bidets, you can choose to face the bidet's water controls – or you can face away from them, as you would on a toilet. It is usually easier to control the temperature and flow of the water if you face the controls. You will be able to see the water as it comes out, so you might have a simpler time cleaning yourself.[4]

  • If you are wearing pants, you may need to remove them to straddle the bidet facing the controls. If you don't want to completely take off your pants, try stepping out of one leg so that you can swing your legs around the bidet. In add-on bidets, things are much more straightforward. You have not to take off your pants.[5]
  • In standalone bidets ultimately, the way you face may be dictated by the position of the jets, and which area of your body that you wish to clean. That is to say: if you need to clean your front, it might be easier to face the jets. If you're cleaning your rear, try facing away from the stream.

4

Activate a toilet seat bidet. Look for the “Wash” button on the bidet’s remote control, which is usually mounted on the wall next to the toilet. You may also find the button on the toilet itself. A nozzle will appear beneath you and rinse your nether regions with a stream of water.[6]

  • When you're done, simply press the “Stop” button. The nozzle will rinse itself off and retract back into the seat.
  • In mechanically controlled add-on bidets, you just turn the lever or pull a string and turn the mains valve.