I have to be honest: I don't know if I'm saying too much? If I'm not saying enough? I know I have a responsibility to speak out about what's right, as does everyone at all times, especially now. And looking for ways to better understand what's happening, and been happening, in our country is part of it. Listening. Learning. Knowing more to be able to help more.
So if you're looking for ways to understand more about the systemic racism that's led to the murder of George Floyd and many other African-Americans, Elite Daily has come up with this list of nine must-watch movies for you:
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  • The Hate U Give. An excellent story for teens who are looking to understand police brutality, and how anyone can make change happen, no matter who they are.
  • Do the Right Thing. The story stars an ensemble cast, tracing how one neighborhood's racial tension explodes and how police brutality escalates the problem. It's a must-watch for those looking to understand how long these issues have been bubbling to the surface.
  • Get Out. On the surface, it's a fantasy. However, by discussing racism as a parable, director Jordan Peele can dig deeper into liberal ignorance and hubris about race than he might have by directly coming at the issue.
  • Fences. This August Wilson adaptation is a reminder of how the mindset of living a life defined by injustice is passed down from parent to child.
  • If Beale Street Could Talk. The story traces the relationship between Tish and Fonny, whose lives are ruined when Fonny is falsely charged for a crime he didn't do. The film follows Fonny's odyssey through the criminal justice system, highlighting all the forms racial injustice takes in America in the court system. How these two manage in the face of Fonny's mistreatment is as uplifting as watching the system grind them down is heartbreaking.
  • The Color Purple. It emphasizes the bonds between women, as well as how the power of imagining a better life and a better world is one of the keys to overcoming a world designed to keep you oppressed.
  • Fruitvale Station. It's a story of hope cut short, giving audiences all the possibilities of Grant's life until a fateful moment when a white cop thoughtlessly snatched it away.
  • Interior in the Dust. Think of it as your alternative to the far more famous white-savior-complex-focused To Kill A Mockingbird.
  • Selma.

    I've only watched one of the movies on this list, so it looks like I've got plans for my rainy weekend ahead. Trying to do more, understand more, and be better. Let's get it.